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Book Review: Dinosaur Training by Brooks Kubik

Reviewed by: Nick Wilson, Asst. S & C Coach – University of Detroit Mercy

In a time where there is always a “new and improved” way to get strong and get in shape, this book is refreshingly different.The main premise of Dinosaur Training by Brooks Kubik is that if you want to get bigger and stronger you need to LIFT HEAVY WEIGHTS and WORK REALLY HARD!!

It sounds so simple, but as you look around weight rooms across the country today, you find people focusing on “functional” training instead of just trying to get strong.I’ll be the first to admit that I have also moved in that direction, so I am no different than anyone else.After reading this book I really spent some time looking at how I train my athletes and what I am trying to do with them.I am in no way saying that functional training is a waste of time, but this book has a way of making you think about how important strength is and how to develop it.

The book talks about using things like 3″ bars, single sets, grip training, and lifting foreign objects to push yourself to your limits and beyond.Kubik talks a lot about using training tools like sandbags, beer kegs, and anvils to develop strength.All of these things are great but they need to be used appropriately given the specific needs of your athletes, training experience and facilities.I don’t necessarily think that adolescent soccer players need to lift anvils, but he doesn’t suggest that either.The point is, this book has some excellent ideas for certain populations, but it’s not necessarily appropriate for everyone.

Kubik has a way of breaking things down very simply.He doesn’t try to talk over your head and get all “scientific” like some books out there do.He does talk about some of the science behind his methods, but he doesn’t concentrate on it, which makes it easier to read.

I had a lot of people recommend this book to me many times over the years.Once I finally broke down and got a copy, I found that it read like you were talking to someone you have known and worked with for years.If you’re not a bookworm who reads everything out there, this is probably one you’ll enjoy.It’s very practical with plenty of ideas you can easily implement or experiment with.This is not necessarily meant for beginners to the iron game or those who are looking to lose weight and tone up.

If you don’t enjoy working really hard or you’re not interested in getting bigger and stronger, don’t get this book.If you work mainly with young kids or normal adults, you may get a few ideas, but it’s not necessarily a must read.If you need a ton of scientific evidence in your literature, you may get a little frustrated.

For anyone in the strength and conditioning field, I would give Dinosaur Training two thumbs up and would definitely recommend it.I think it is particularly appropriate for coaches who train athletes in combat sports like football, hockey, wrestling, and lacrosse.It doesn’t address every single aspect of training an athlete, but it gives you a sense of the history of strength and conditioning while presenting a different perspective on training athletes to get bigger and stronger.If you love working hard, working your athletes hard or you’re looking to get some new “old school” ideas, you’ve got to get this book.

You can purchase your own copy of Dinosaur Training at www.brookskubik.com for $19.95 + $7 shipping & handling.

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Trackbacks/Pingbacks

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